Summary of the proposal

A hot topic at the moment is the “800 calorie diet” that the NHS are providing for those who suffer from Type 2 Diabetes.

A recent study has shown that NHS England are currently spending 10% of their budget on “treating” people with Type 2 Diabetes.

Type 2 Diabetes is commonly caused from poor diet alongside lack of exercise.

The NHS has posed to reverse Type 2 Diabetes to sufferers with an 800 calorie diet consisting of 200 calorie sachets four times a day for three months. The sachets are soup and shake based, yummy.

A female who took part in the trail, Isobel Murray, stated “the liquid diet was relatively easy, eating normal food is the hardest bit”

Eating normal food is the hardest bit, saaayyyy what?! As a personal trainer this is a huge no no from me. I teach clients to have a positive relationship with food.

 

Why I think its a bad idea

It sounds great putting something in place that will drop you 6 stone and reverse your diabetes but have the NHS posed to help the public afterwards when they have a bad relationship with food? Are they going to put things in place for all those who suffer with health complications from crash dieting?  Your probably reading this thinking “health complications, yeah right” but it is a known fact that you could suffer the consequences from crash dieting. Below are some of the problems that occur post 800 calorie diet..

  • Muscle loss
  • Heart arrhythmia
  • Menstrual issues (like us women don’t suffer enough anyway!)
  • Headaches
  • High uric acid (leading to gout / kidney stones)
  • Low blood pressure

All fad diets have a huge effect on the body, diabetes or no diabetes. Crash dieting, as it’s known in the fitness industry, is great for quick results but is the aftermath your left with really worth having soup and shakes for weeks on end.

Dieting doesn’t have to be dieting. You need to make it a lifestyle change so you don’t go back to the same old you 12 months ago. Unhappy, moody, binge eater and unhealthy. This can again apply to people with AND without diabetes.

Try these easy tips to get started

Here are some top tips to start you off. Keep it simple, remember you’re a fulltime worker with a busy hectic lifestyle, not a Greek god gym rat.

  • Keep it clean with home cooked food three times a day.
  • Cut DOWN (not cut out) on the chocolate, crisps and sweeties.
  • Move more, you don’t have to be in the gym 24 hours a day but get out for walks, play in the park with you children, take your dog up that fell you can see outside your window, walk your hamster if you need to!
  • Up your water intake, cut down on the full fat drinks and replace with water. Your body and mind will appreciate this.

Look after yourself. You are important.

If you’ve read this and learnt something, great.

If your sat reading this and this applies to you or you know someone that it could apply to, research before you jump in with both feet. Anyone reading this is more than welcome to get up to Xtreme Fitness and have a chat with a member of staff, we can and will help.

More Info

Click here for the England NHS article

Beth | Personal Trainer